National Youth Violence Prevention Week

By Clarette Glenn with Alliance Health

National Youth Violence Prevention Week is April 8-12, 2019 in the United States. Youth violence is the intentional use of force or power to threaten or harm others by young people ages 10-24. Typically youth violence involves young people hurting other peers who are unrelated to them and/or that they may not know well. Youth violence takes different forms and can look like fights, bullying, gang-related violence and threats with weapons.
Thousands of people experience youth violence daily. Youth violence is very common. Nearly 1 in 5 high school students reported being bullied on school property within the last year. Homicide is the third leading cause of death for ages 10-24. There are approximately 14 young people who die by homicide daily and almost 1400 treated in emergency departments.
Youth violence is preventable. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) offers a Comprehensive Technical Package that prioritizes prevention strategies based on best available evidence. Some of the strategies suggested in the technical package include promoting family environments that support healthy development, provide quality early education, and connect youth with caring adults and activities. Also, for activities that can be completed locally during the week of April 8-12, 2019, please see the National Youth Violence Prevention Week toolkit visit, http://nationalsave.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/2019-NYVPW-ActionKit.pdf.

Please join us on Friday, April 12, 2019 for a screening of Paper Tigers.

Where: Alliance Health – Wake Site

5000 Falls of Neuse Rd, Ste. 310

Raleigh, NC 27609

What is ‘Paper Tigers’?

‘Paper Tigers’ chronicles a year in the life of Lincoln High School in the community of Walla Walla, Washington. The kids who come to Lincoln have a history of truancy, behavioral problems and substance abuse. After Lincoln’s principal is exposed to research about the effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), he decides to radically change the school’s approach to discipline. With the aid of diary camera footage, the film follows six students. From getting into fights, grappling with traumatic events in their lives, and on the cusp of dropping out, they find healing, support and academic promise at Lincoln High.

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